America, You Asked For It!

Political News and Commentary from the Right

Curtis Coleman’s Campaign Launch Party

Last week I had the pleasure of attending one of Curtis Coleman‘s “Campaign Launch Parties” at the home of his daughter and son-in-law.  This wasn’t a huge gala with party big-wigs, lobbyists, and press, but an opportunity for concerned cititzens to get to know, personally and politically, the man who plans to defeat Blanche Lincoln in November 2010.  In fact, it was a simple reception with cheese cake and soft drinks held in the living room of his daughter’s home.   Other than Mr. Coleman, his wife, daughter and son-in-law, there were 10 others who attended to learn more about the man who may be the next Senator from Arkansas.   Coleman gave a presentation introducing himself and his political positions on key issues.  The presentation was followed by a question and answer session that was more open than I thought possible from dialogue with a politician.  But then again, Coleman isn’t a typical politician, he’s a businessman seeking political office.

I came away with the impression that Mr. Coleman is a true conservative who will stand firm against liberal Democrats and even his own party when its leadership goes against his conservative ideology.

His presentation began reminding everyone in attendance that he’s still “exploring” the feasibility of a Senate run for strategic reasons, but that he’s serious about running.  He explained that a formal announcement would place him in a completely different status with the Federal Elections Commission.  When asked if he knew approximately when a formal announcement would come, he said he had two prior commitments he planned to follow through on–one project at his company, Safe Foods, and his commitment to serve as chairman of the Central Arkansas Cityfest with Luis Palau–before officially throwing his hat in the ring.   Originally he thought his commitment to these projects would be wrapped up by October, but informed us that things were progressing and other events occurring that might push that timeline up to sometime this summer.

So what motivated Coleman to run?  He told us he spoke to the Republican Party of Arkansas soon after last year’s November election and asked them, “Who do we have to run against Blanche in 2010?”  At the time, their response was, “No one, why don’t you run?”  He returned home upset.  He didn’t want to run and it didn’t appear anyone else would take up the conservative colors and lead the charge either.  When he realized that he was upset with others for not doing what he wasn’t willing to do, he changed his mind and began to seriously consider stepping up to the plate.  Ultimately, his concern for the country his children and grandchildren will inherit pushed him over the edge and into the race.

On the issues, Coleman took on the Obama administration’s tax and spend policies.  Coleman equates paying taxes with sacrificing personal liberty.  “Your paycheck represents your personal liberty as much as any one thing you have.”  While recognizing some taxes are necessary to fund defense, maintain civil order, and fund basic government services, he believes we’re taxed enough.  Though the President often claims he won’t increase taxes on anyone making less than $250,000 per year, Coleman recognizes the administration’s out-of-control-spending will mandate tax increases at some point in the future. To evidence his commitment to not increasing taxes on Americans, the prospective Senator has signed the Americans for Tax Reform’s Taxpayer Protection Pledge which Lincoln refuses to sign.

He believes TARP, Obama’s stimulus, auto industry bailouts, mortgage relief, and Cap and Trade are more about ideology than the economy and environment–all are part of a strategy Coleman dubs “The March to Mediocrity,” intended to bring the highest wage earners down and the lowest wage earners up to meet somewhere in the middle.  He sees these supposed “stimuli,” imposed on the American people by Obama and Congressional Democrats, as components of Obama’s scheme to “redistribute the wealth” and understands such efforts are more likely to bring everyone down to the level of those at the lower end of the scale.

Citing Congressional Budget Office figures, he pointed out that a 20-year-old will pay $114,000 in interest–just on the debt arising from the 2010 budget–over his/her working life.  This, Coleman says, “is why we’re suffering the most egregious erosion of our personal liberties in history…turning our dreams into our children’s nightmare.”

Coleman lays the bulk of the blame for the nation’s current economic woes directly at the feet of the US Congress for passing legislation that forced banks to make bad loans.  He lays out the case for pinning the housing implosion on the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977.  This law required banks’ loan portfolios to represent the demographics of their lending area or face losing their FDIC insurance.  He points out that Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae became involved during the Clinton administration, and began to insure these subprime mortgages.  “It didn’t come from Wall Street, it came from Congress,” Coleman says of the US mortgage crisis.

Curtis Coleman appears the quintessential conservative.  He supports tax cuts and responsible spending–government living within its means.  He recognizes government policy that creates onerous demands on business and industry force prices up and our standard of living down, effectively restricting our personal liberty.  He’s unapologetic about his pro-life stance.  And, he’s confident enough with his positions that he’ll stand before his constituents and answer their questions without subterfuge.

It was heartening to see a potential candidate for the Senate sit down and discuss the issues with ordinary Arkansans and Coleman promised that, if elected, he’ll be sure to have at least one event like this in each county in Arkansas every year he’s in office.

Early in his presentation he explained he wanted us to participate–to ask questions and give our opinions.  His words–“I don’t learn anything when I do all the talking.”  He also informed us he’s willing to host five of these Campaign Launch Parties each week until he officially declares his candidacy.  If you’re interested in hosting one in your home, contact Coleman at scheduling@CurtisColeman.com.

You can read Curtis Coleman’s blog and also follow him on Twitter and Facebook to learn more.

John Allison III
Cabot, AR
US
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July 1, 2009 - Posted by | Election 2010 | , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. John, thanks for blogging about the party. Glad we got to see you and Janice and glad you enjoyed it. Go Curtis!

    Comment by stevemackey | July 1, 2009 | Reply

    • It was great to see you and Randi too Steve. I’m just happy to see good Conservative Republicans step up to the plate to stand against the professional politicians that care for nothing other than getting themselves re-elected to consolidate their power. With God’s help we’ll take back enough seats next year to check the Dems’ power grab.

      Comment by John Allison, III | July 1, 2009 | Reply

  2. […] Read more: Curtis Coleman's Campaign Launch Party « America, You Asked For It! […]

    Pingback by 20 Year Mortgage » Curtis Coleman's Campaign Launch Party « America, You Asked For It! | July 1, 2009 | Reply

  3. […] the Right: Newbie conservative blogger John Allison III attends a campaign event for potential GOP Senate candidate Curtis Coleman and likes what he sees. (America, You Asked For It) Blinded Me With Science: Little Rock may get a […]

    Pingback by Stuff From Around Arkansas, July 2 | The Arkansas Project | July 2, 2009 | Reply


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