America, You Asked For It!

Political News and Commentary from the Right

Crisis of culture, not health care

The following was originally published as a letter to the editor in the Mississippi Clarion Ledger last fall. Snopes verifies the letter was correctly attributed.

During my last night’s shift in the ER, I had the pleasure of evaluating a patient with an expensive shiny gold tooth, multiple elaborate expensive tattoos, a very expensive brand of tennis shoes and a new cellular telephone equipped with her favorite R&B tune for a ringtone.. Glancing over the chart, one could not help noticing her payer status: Medicaid. She smokes more than one costly pack of cigarettes every day and, somehow, still has money to buy beer.

And our Congress expects me to pay for this woman’s health care? Our nation’s health care crisis is not a shortage of quality hospitals, doctors or nurses. It is a crisis of culture ˜ a culture in which it is perfectly acceptable to spend money on vices while refusing to take care of one’s self or, heaven forbid, purchase health insurance. A culture that thinks “I can do whatever I want to because someone else will always take care of me”. Life is really not that hard. Most of us reap what we sow. Don’t you agree?

STARNER JONES, MD
Jackson , MS

I guess Dr. Jones wasn’t present at the White House to show his support for the President’s redistribution of resources to seize control of 1/6 of the US economy, but Jones certainly hits the nail on the head.

January 15, 2010 Posted by | Health Care | , , , , , | 1 Comment

King of the Blacks

No, it’s not Barack Obama…at least in this article by columnist Joseph C. Phillips.  But this is a black columnist pointing out what he sees as the biggest obstacle to achievement in the black community.  Using his own son’s experience as an example, his poignant essay asks “How is it that…the ‘king of the Blacks’ is the kid that flunked 8th grade?”

by Joseph C. Phillips at Townhall.com

My wife and I have big dreams for our children. We want nothing for them but health, happiness and success and we recognize that a good education can be a step towards realizing that goal. We also demand that our children perform up to their potential. The skills one learns in school – study habits, attention to detail, and meeting deadlines – are essential for success in the work world. In this we are like every other parent in America.

However we are also Black parents of a certain generation and so the subtleties of race continue to speak to us and they are very real. Sometimes we are not sure if we are responding atavistically to the faint smell of something in the air or if what we are hearing are the soft echoes of our own imaginations. It’s sometimes impossible to tell, which is why race and issues associated with race (to coin a phrase from the late Ralph Wiley) continue to make Black People want to shout.

Last week I had what my parents generation used to call a “come to Jesus meeting” with my 7th grade son. His mid-term report card arrived in the mail. His mother and I were under-whelmed.

The comments on my son’s report card indicated that he is under the mistaken impression that school is for socializing and his grades reflect a rather lackluster effort at best. I went “old school:” after a brief lecture he received some tactile encouragement to start taking care of TCB.

There are many black students at my sons’ middle school, but he is 1 of only 3 in the highly-gifted magnet program within the school. The HGM is a program restricted to students that score 99.9% on an intellectual assessment test. One of three! That doesn’t leave much wiggle room to be the black kid that can’t cut it, that clowns in class or that falls behind.

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December 21, 2009 Posted by | Education | , , , , | 1 Comment